Last month, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) resolved a Fair Housing Act (FHA) case against a New York based property management company in which the government asserted the defendants discriminated against a prospective home purchaser on the basis of his disability and by refusing to provide reasonable accommodations as required by law.

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The issue of online medical verifications for emotional support animals (ESA’s) is an ongoing problem for professional apartment management. As written in this space before, we want to approve all legitimate reasonable accommodation requests for our residents who need assistance animals. The key, of course, is “legitimate” – and that is the issue. I

As written in this space (and elsewhere) all too frequently, professional apartment owners and managers have seen a significant surge in the number of reasonable accommodation requests by residents with animals. Some of these requests are legitimate and we are happy to approve them. An increasing percentage of these requests, however, appear to be

A legitimate question from leasing office professionals I get from time to time is: “We approved an emotional support animal for a resident two years ago. Does that approval continue indefinitely or can we seek a supplemental medical verification from time to time?” My answer is that there are any number of disabilities for which

In this era of an ever-increasing number of service and/or emotional support animal requests received by professional apartment leasing offices, three of my clients have faced the same issue recently. Here is a common fact pattern: our resident submits a request for an emotional support animal. That request has a medical verification letter or certificate

A couple of weeks ago, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) filed a new Fair Housing Act (FHA) lawsuit against the owner, builder, and designer of a housing complex near Central Washington University in Ellensburg, Washington. In the complaint, the DOJ asserts that the apartment-style homes were constructed without complying with the FHA’s accessibility requirements.